manifest05

manifest05:

The Museum of Contemporary Art in Tehran by Kamran Diba in 1977. It was built to house the collection amassed by Shahbanu (Queen) Farah Pahlavi. It includes many important works such as Pollock’s On Indian Red Ground, Warhol’s Mao Series and Portraits of the Iranian Royal Family, Calder mobiles, Max Ernst’s Capricorn, Van Gogh’s At Eternity’s Gate, René Magritte’s The Therapeutae, Alberto Giacometti’s Standing Woman, and Pablo Picasso’s Baboon and Young. Aside from possessing the largest collection of Western art outside of Europe and the Americas, it also exhibits significant works of Iranian contemporary art such as Parviz Tanavoli’s Sanctified. The building itself is inspired by the southern Iranian desert towns of Yazd, Nain, Bushehr, and Meybod which are cityscapes defined mud brick and windtowers. Instead of capturing wind, the towers capture light in moderation to prevent damage to the artwork while still allowing for natural sunlight to enter the galleries. The concrete was poured very thick, like mud brick, to moderate the temperature of the interior. This shows the evolution of traditional architecture and the retention of its aesthetic and utilitarian value, which was unique for this era of westernization under an Eurocentric monarchy.

procrete

procrete:

The construction of Charles House, Kensington High Street, London (circa 1950) - now demolished.

Prior to construction, the site was used as a makeshift ambulance depot, which fuelled rumours that Charles House was originally designed as a hospital before being changed to an office building mid-construction. It’s widely agreed that this isn’t true but it makes an interesting tale.

Charles House was designed by Arthur S. Ash and built 1948-50. It was constructed using a reinforced concrete frame with brick cladding. The second image shows the stages of construction in February, June and August 1949. It has since been demolished to make way for an eco-village.

unavidamoderna
unavidamoderna:

Vista de la seccion de secretarias privados con una mampara construida de latón martillado, Oficinas Hojalata y Lámina SA en el edifico Seguros La Comercial, Paseo de la Reforma 116, Col. Juárez, México DF 1964 
Arqs. Héctor Mestre y Manuel de la Colina 
Diseño de interiores. arq. Leopoldo Domínguez
View of the private secretaries office with a screen of hammered brass, Hojalata y Lamina company office, Seguros La Comercial building, Paseo de la Reforma, Mexico City 1964

unavidamoderna:

Vista de la seccion de secretarias privados con una mampara construida de latón martillado, Oficinas Hojalata y Lámina SA en el edifico Seguros La Comercial, Paseo de la Reforma 116, Col. Juárez, México DF 1964 

Arqs. Héctor Mestre y Manuel de la Colina 

Diseño de interiores. arq. Leopoldo Domínguez

View of the private secretaries office with a screen of hammered brass, Hojalata y Lamina company office, Seguros La Comercial building, Paseo de la Reforma, Mexico City 1964